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Our four course, eight string, Greek Bouzouki is a beautiful instrument with a rich history. The fingering is the same as the higher four strings on a guitar, and the same as the fingering on a ukulele. The tuning, however, is different, the recommended being Cc Ff aa dd.

The Roosebeck Bouzouki has a European spruce soundboard, sheesham fingerboard, and mahogany neck. The soundboard, fingerboard, and headstock have beautifully designed custom lacewood inlays. The scale length is 26.25" (667mm). There is a truss rod in neck. Does not come with a case.

The Bouzouki dates back to Byzantine times, and in Greece, was known as a pandura. It later became known as a tambouras, and around the 19th century evolved into the modern day bouzouki. In the 1960's, the Irish Bouzouki became popular in traditional Celtic music. The Irish Bouzouki looks a little more like a mandolin, and it is tuned differently than this traditional Greek counterpart.

PROP - NON-PLAYABLE - AS IS - NO RETURNS "PROPS" are damaged or defective instruments that are not playable. These instruments are perfect for use as theatrical props or as decor items only.

Actual wood color and decorations may vary from photo. Strings may be missing or broken. Accessories not included.

Our four course, eight string, Greek Bouzouki is a beautiful instrument with a rich history. The fingering is the same as the higher four strings on a guitar, and the same as the fingering on a ukulele. The tuning, however, is different, the recommended being Cc Ff aa dd.

The Roosebeck Bouzouki has a European spruce soundboard, sheesham fingerboard, and mahogany neck. The soundboard, fingerboard, and headstock have beautifully designed custom lacewood inlays. The scale length is 26.25" (667mm). There is a truss rod in neck. Does not come with a case.

The Bouzouki dates back to Byzantine times, and in Greece, was known as a pandura. It later became known as a tambouras, and around the 19th century evolved into the modern day bouzouki. In the 1960's, the Irish Bouzouki became popular in traditional Celtic music. The Irish Bouzouki looks a little more like a mandolin, and it is tuned differently than this traditional Greek counterpart.

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